Category: Bible

Three Year Cycle Bible readings

Question:

How well do you think a person would retain knowledge of the NT by listening to it over the course of 3 years?


Very well indeed.

What about the other 30% that is not heard?

Catholics listen to the entire Bible in a 3 year cycle.

Having said that, there are some parts of Scripture which seem to be emphasized over others.

There is information in the OT which is not essential for one’s salvation. Its stuff like this which was anulled by Christ on the Cross:

Leviticus 14:13
And he shall slay the lamb in the place where he shall kill the sin offering and the burnt offering, in the holy place: for as the sin offering is the priest’s, so is the trespass offering: it is most holy:

Because:

Ephesians 2:15
Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;

Therefore, the ordinances about sacrifices and washings are not stressed to Catholics.
Sincerely,
De Maria
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Is St. Paul confusing?

In this article, I would like to explain:

1. What, in my opinion, is confusing about St. Paul’s theology.
2. How it is different from the theology of the other New Testament authors and
3. What I believe is Martin Luther’s misunderstanding…..Read More.

Protestant Assumptions about the Assumption  

What came first, the chicken or the egg?
What came first? The doctrine? Or the practice? In my opinion, Protestants function under the premise that:
a. all doctrine is first, written down.
b. the Church issues the doctrine in some sort of edict.
c. the Catholic faithful now begin to follow this doctrine.
Although that is how God promulgated the Ten Commandments in the Old Testament. That is probably ….(Read More).

Does the Bible say that missing the Mass is a mortal sin?

The Catholic Church teaches that missing the Mass is a mortal sin.

Protestants object vehemently to this teaching. They claim that the Catholic Church oversteps its bounds when she requires her members to attend the Mass on pains of mortal sin. Many nominal Catholics, having been convinced of the Protestant argument, have fallen away because of it. But, what does the Bible say?

See the rest, here.

What role do works play in our salvation?

Matthew 25:41-46

King James Version (KJV)
41Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels:
42For I was an hungred, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink:
43I was a stranger, and ye took me not in: naked, and ye clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not.
44Then shall they also answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, or athirst, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee?
45Then shall he answer them, saying, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me.
46And these shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal.
Note that the goats did nothing.  They did nothing at all.  They did not commit any evil sin.  They did not jump on or beat up the innocent.  They did not steal their food.

They simply did nothing at all.

Note also that they called Jesus, Lord.

Faith without works is dead, being alone.  (James 2:17)

Who is right? St. James or St. Paul?

St. James actually teaches the imprecise lesson. We are saved by faith and works, “so to speak”. Because they are necessary prerequisites.

I think we all agree that “faith” is a necessary prerequisite, do we not?

Hebrews 11:6But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.

And works are also a necessary prerequisite. St. John says:

John 15:2

Every branch in me that beareth not fruit he taketh away:….

Does that mean then, that we work our way to heaven? By no means.

Does it mean that we cleanse our own souls of sins? No way.

Here is what the Catholic Church officially says:

Trent 6

CHAPTER VIII

HOW THE GRATUITOUS JUSTIFICATION OF THE SINNER BY FAITH IS TO BE UNDERSTOOD

But when the Apostle says that man is justified by faith and freely,[44] these words are to be understood in that sense in which the uninterrupted unanimity of the Catholic Church has held and expressed them, namely, that we are therefore said to be justified by faith, because faith is the beginning of human salvation, the foundation and root of all justification, without which it is impossible to please God[45] and to come to the fellowship of His sons;

and we are therefore said to be justified gratuitously, because none of those things that precede justification, whether faith or works, merit the grace of justification.

For, if by grace, it is not now by works, otherwise, as the Apostle says, grace is no more grace.[46]

 Note the bold italics.
St. Paul teaches the same thing, but more precisely. He says:

Romans 2:13

For not the hearers of the law are just before God, but the doers of the law shall be justified.

The only thing he needs to add to that to be absolutely precise are the words, “by God”. It would then read:

For not the hearers of the law are just before God, but the doers of the law shall be justified by God.

Here’s the rest of the Catholic Teaching from Trent:

CHAPTER VII

IN WHAT THE JUSTIFICATION OF THE SINNER CONSISTS, AND WHAT ARE ITS CAUSES

This disposition or preparation is followed by justification itself, which is not only a remission of sins but also the sanctification and renewal of the inward man through the voluntary reception of the grace and gifts whereby an unjust man becomes just and from being an enemy becomes a friend, that he may be an heir according to hope of life everlasting.[30]

The causes of this justification are:

the final cause is the glory of God and of Christ and life everlasting; the efficient cause is the merciful God who washes and sanctifies[31] gratuitously, signing and anointing with the holy Spirit of promise, who is the pledge of our inheritance,[32] the meritorious cause is His most beloved only begotten, our Lord Jesus Christ, who, when we were enemies,[33] for the exceeding charity wherewith he loved us,[34] merited for us justification by His most holy passion on the wood of the cross and made satisfaction for us to God the Father, the instrumental cause is the sacrament of baptism, which is the sacrament of faith,[35] without which no man was ever justified finally, the single formal cause is the justice of God, not that by which He Himself is just, but that by which He makes us just, that, namely, with which we being endowed by Him, are renewed in the spirit of our mind,[36] and not only are we reputed but we are truly called and are just, receiving justice within us, each one according to his own measure, which the Holy Ghost distributes to everyone as He wills,[37] and according to each one’s disposition and cooperation.

Again, please note the bold italics.

What the Church teaches is that it is God who justifies….those who have faith in Him and obey His will. In other words, those who permit Him to work through them to achieve His purpose.
Again I hope that I have not overcomplicated the matter for you. Your understanding is already correct.

What does the Bible say about transubstantiation?

Nothing.

Transubstantiation is a big word that means changing one substance to another.  The word itself is never found in Scripture because the word had not yet been coined.  That wouldn’t happen for many more centuries.

However, there are examples of transubstantiation in the Bible.  Jesus Christ transubstantiated water into wine in the Wedding at Cana.

And Jesus Christ transubstantiated bread into His Body and wine into His Blood in the Last Supper.

Matthew 26:
26 And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body.
27 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it;
28 For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.